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Grantee Publications

Results Matter: Direct Services Grants Program Evaluation

This edition of Results Matter highlights findings from the evaluation of Healthcare Georgia Foundation’s Direct Services Grant Program. The purpose of the evaluation was to assess if the Foundation’s new approach helped attract a higher caliber of applicant that provided effective healthcare services and programs within the Foundation’s priority areas. The evaluation also examined whether or not this new approach funded more effective, higher performing organizations that contributed to the Foundation’s outcomes of interest. Information gained from the evaluation will be used to improve upon the Direct Services Grant Program and inform the Foundation’s decisions about the program’s future direction.

Recommended Citation: Results Matter: Findings From an Evaluation of Healthcare Georgia Foundation’s Direct Services Grant Program, Highland Nonprofit Consulting, LLC, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Issue 1, February 2016, Publication #96.

Evaluation in Underserved Communities

Every year throughout the state of Georgia new organizations emerge with some of the most innovative approaches imaginable aimed at addressing very complex health problems among diverse groups of vulnerable populations. Evaluation in Underserved Communities is designed as a resource for both newly formed and smaller organizations to provide program administrators with a practical guide in applying best practices towards establishing a strong foundation for evaluating community-based programs serving underserved populations. It aims to outline key tasks and strategies for conducting evaluation in organizations working in underserved communities; and thereby contributing to the process of helping promising programs reach their full potential and institutionalize evaluation practices.

Recommended Citation: Evaluation in Underserved Communities, Quinn M. Gentry, PhD, MBA, Tekla Evans, MPH, CHES, PMP, Elandis Miller, MPH, Messages of Empowerment Productions, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #89, October 2014.

Understanding Public Attitudes: A Primer on Polling the General Public

The purpose of this publication is to help nonprofit health organizations understand what polling is and what strategic value surveys can offer them. It also features the benefits of public opinion research, strengths and weaknesses of several methodologies, and data analysis. Nonprofits will also gain insight about working with a research partner, including how to avoid pitfalls and ensure that the process accomplishes strategic objectives.

Recommended Citation: Understanding Public Attitudes - A Primer on Polling the General Public, Beth S. Schapiro, PhD and Rusty Parker, PhD, The Schapiro Group, Inc., Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #70, January 2013.

Using Focus Groups to Enhance Your Evaluation

Like most organizations, health nonprofits have questions about how others perceive their organization and/or programs. This publication introduces the concept of using focus groups to enhance evaluation for nonprofit organizations, including: focus group definition and use, planning and conducting a focus group, and post focus group tactics. It also features case studies and tips on how to bet analyze, interpret, and use findings.

Recommended Citation: Using Focus Groups to Enhance Your Evaluation, Maggie Jones, MPH, Elizabeth Carson-Cheng, MPH, Center for Community Health and Evaluation; and Nicole Lezin, consultant to CCHE, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #71, January 2013.

Storytelling Approaches to Program Evaluation: An Introductory Guide

Traditional approaches to reporting the results of program evaluations, which rely on formal questionnaires and statistical data, fail to offer the program participants the chance to tell their own stories in their words. Storytelling can be an important method or strategy for capturing and communicating results of a program or organization to various audiences. In fact, many funders and stakeholders are now encouraging grantees to include stories in their evaluation reports. The purpose of this publication is to provide nonprofit health organizations with information and suggestions on how to collect and share stories as part of a program evaluation.

Recommended Citation: Storytelling Approaches to Program Evaluation: An Introductory Guide, Joseph Tobin, Ph.D., Gustavo E. Fischman, Ph.D., and Sylvia Sukop, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #73, February 2013

Ideas From & For Georgia’s Trauma System

Georgia is experiencing a crisis in the capacity of the state’s trauma centers to care for those who are seriously injured throughout the state. These issues are common in states across the nation, and particularly in the South and Southwest where there are high proportions of uninsured and large rural areas.

Bishop + Associates, with grant support from Healthcare Georgia Foundation, has compiled a comprehensive report identifying the key issues and ideas for planning Georgia’s trauma system for the many challenges that lie ahead over the next few decades.

Recommended Citation: Ideas From & For Georgia’s Trauma System, Greg Bishop, Kelly Gallipeau and Ann Lin, Bishop + Associates, January 2009

Trust for America’s Health: Prevention for a Healthier Georgia: Investments in Disease Prevention Yield Significant Savings, Stronger Communities

Helping Georgians stay healthier is one of the best ways to drive down health care costs and ensure our workforce will be competitive in the global economy.

This report finds that a strategic investment in disease prevention could result in significant savings in the state’s health care costs. This study specifically examined how much Georgia could save if we reduced disease rates by investing more in proven community-based pro-grams that result in increased levels of physical activity, improved nutrition, and a reduction in smoking and other tobacco use rates.

Recommended Citation: Trust for America’s Health: Prevention for a Healthier Georgia: Investments in Disease Prevention Yield Significant Savings, Stronger Communities, Georgia Budget and Policy Institute, January 2009

Trust for America’s Health: Key Research Findings – Survey and Focus Group Analysis

On behalf of Healthcare Georgia Foundation and the Trust for America’s Health, Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research and Public Opinion Strategies conducted a research project to examine key public health issues.

Key findings of this research include: Georgians’ support of the investment of prevention when it comes to health issues, accountability, concern over major health issues, such as obesity, food safety, and government capabilities.

Recommended Citation: Trust for America’s Health: Key Research Findings – Survey and Focus Group Analysis, Georgia Budget and Policy Institute, January 2009

A Case for Health: Community Health Mission

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, more than 1.6 million Georgians are uninsured; many more are underinsured, leaving a significant portion of our state’s population with little to no access to health care. Across the state, community leaders, organizations, and individuals are collaborating to create health care safety nets to help those seeking affordable health care services.

A Case for Health: Community Health Mission is the first in a series of Healthcare Georgia Foundation publications addressing the importance of the health safety net in Georgia. It highlights the important work of Community Health Mission and the unique attributes of the Chatham County Safety Net Planning Council, which have resulted in the delivery of coordinated, productive health care services.

Recommended Citation: A Case for Health: Community Health Mission, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #28, June 2008

Engaging Volunteers for Better Healthcare in Georgia

According to the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of people who have volunteered at least once has declined in each of the last two years. To counteract the current stagnation and decline in volunteer participation among some groups of health professionals, Georgia’s health safety net clinics and programs must become more diligent and creative at volunteer recruitment than ever before.

This publication focuses on strategies and methods for improving recruitment, management and retention of licensed clinicians by health safety net clinics and programs. Highlights include: peer-to-peer contact, Internet resources, addressing lawsuit concerns, messaging, best practices, retention and recognition.

Recommended Citation: Engaging Volunteers for Better Healthcare in Georgia, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #27, April 2008

Rx for Robust Boards: Moving Your Nonprofit Board from Average to Exceptional

A highly engaged, quality board of directors is critical to the overall success of your organization. This publication will help you understand your board’s role and structure, assess its strengths and weaknesses, and help move it from disengagement to engagement.

Recommended Citation: Rx for Robust Boards: Moving Your Nonprofit Board from Average to Exceptional, Nicole Lezin, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #25, March 2008

Nonprofit Business Plan Development: From Vision, Mission and Values to Implementation

Business planning is a vital component for any nonprofit organization. This planning is the blueprint that helps to establish a foundation upon which the organization can focus on its vision, tailor its mission and incorporate values it deems essential to the organization’s success. This document provides and overview of the steps in the planning process (including SWOT analysis), vision and mission statement development, and goal setting.

Recommended Citation: Nonprofit Business Plan Development: From Vision, Mission and Values to Implementation, Terri Theisen, Healthcare Georgia Foundation, Publication #24, March 2008

Addressing Overweight: Interventions Tailored to the Rural South

The obesity epidemic, especially in the rural South, has created an urgent need for effective intervention programs that can be replicated across communities. Successful programs help communities to assess risks, increase public knowledge, and create environmental supports to foster healthy eating and physical activity habits among children and adults.

Wilkes Wild About Wellness (WWW) is a comprehensive, community-based program in Washington, Georgia focused on combating obesity and related chronic diseases. The program was the site of a multi-dimensional nutrition and physical activity intervention. This policy brief highlights the program’s challenges, strategies and recommendations for combating obesity and related chronic diseases.

Recommended Citation: Addressing Overweight: Interventions Tailored to the Rural South, Policy Leadership for Active Youth (PLAY)

Health Care Expenditures and Insurance in Georgia - Full Report

In order to make informed decisions about improving the access and outcome of health care for state residents, Georgia's policymakers require timely health care cost and insurance data. This report analyzes historical and estimated trends in Georgia's health care spending and detail spending per capita by type of service (e.g. physicians, hospitals, and prescription drugs). In addition, the report examines the distribution of health care coverage by several demographic variables, as well as information on Medicaid, PeachCare for Kids and Georgia's State Health Benefit Plan.

This study was conducted by Kenneth E. Thorpe, PhD, Robert W. Woodruff Professor and Chair of the Department of Health Policy and Management at Emory University's Rollins School of Public Health.

Recommended Citation: Health Care Expenditures and Insurance in Georgia - Full Report, 2005

Health Care Expenditures and Insurance in Georgia - Summary

Health Care Expenditures and Insurance in Georgia

In order to make informed decisions about improving the access and outcome of health care for state residents, Georgia's policymakers require timely health care cost and insurance data. This report analyzes historical and estimated trends in Georgia's health care spending and detail spending per capita by type of service (e.g. physicians, hospitals, and prescription drugs). In addition, the report examines the distribution of health care coverage by several demographic variables, as well as information on Medicaid, PeachCare for Kids and Georgia's State Health Benefit Plan.

This study was conducted by Kenneth E. Thorpe, PhD, Robert W. Woodruff Professor and Chair of the Department of Health Policy and Management at Emory University's Rollins School of Public Health.

Recommended Citation: Health Care Expenditures and Insurance in Georgia - Summary, 2005

Latinos in Georgia: A Closer Look

In the past 15 years, Georgia experienced an increase of more than 300% in the number of Latinos calling the state home, with most of the growth occurring in the past ten years.

This statistical brief focuses on demographic, social, health, and other indicators, presenting a comprehensive portrait of Latinos in Georgia. This information is relevant for policy-makers, community-based organizations, and those in the private sector, since Latinos are increasingly becoming an important part of Georgia’s economy and social fabric and will play an integral role in its future development.

Recommended Citation: Latinos in Georgia: A Closer Look, 2005

The Facts About Georgians: Our Health Depends On It

The Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University compiled “The Facts About Georgians: Our Health Depends On It,” a comprehensive look at the health status of Georgians, specifically focused on demographic and social factors, health status, access to care, preventive services, health behaviors and environmental factors.

Recommended Citation: (2003)